How do I contact Facebook about a charge?

If you don’t recognise charges on your mobile phone and would like to contact Facebook, please dispute the charges through Facebook’s Payments Support Center. You’ll find the contact link under the Get Help section at the bottom of the page. You may need to provide transaction information for Facebook to assist you.

Why do I have a Facebook charge on my credit card?

Note: If you recently received a small charge on your credit or debit card, it’s most likely a temporary authorization to validate your card. We make these authorization charges and then immediately invalidate them, so they’ll be removed from your credit or debit card automatically (typically within 3-5 business days).

How do I stop Facebook from charging my credit card?

Tap in the top right of Facebook.

  1. Scroll down and tap Settings.
  2. Tap Facebook Pay.
  3. Tap Add Payment Method.
  4. Tap Credit or Debit Card or tap PayPal to add a payment method to your account. To remove a payment method, tap the existing payment method, then Edit Payment Method, then scroll down and tap Remove Card.

Can Facebook payments be reversed?

No, you can’t cancel a payment you sent in Messenger. Once you have an accepted payment method linked to your account, any money you send is transferred right away. If you send money to someone in Messenger by mistake, you can: Ask them to send the money back to you.

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How do I dispute a payment on facebook messenger?

Go to Settings > Payments. Click on the payment in question to make sure it’s been processed. Open the receipt. Click Dispute and fill in the information.

Why did Facebook charge $25?

If your outstanding ad costs reach $25, we charge you $25. Once your payment goes through, your balance is cleared, your payment threshold may be raised to a new, higher amount. You start accruing costs again as your ad continues to run.

Why did I get a $1 charge from Facebook?

Under the new system, users can message anyone regardless of their privacy settings; the messages end up in a folder labeled “other,” which is designed to catch spam. That’s where the money comes in. To bypass the recipients “other” folder, users can pay $1 to make sure their messages end up in a person’s main inbox.